Marine Corps Principles and Traits of Leadership, Part 1

Marine Corps Principles and Traits of Leadership, Part 1

The Marine Corps recognizes eleven principles of leadership and fourteen traits of leaders. In this and coming editions of “Front and Center,” we will present these principles and traits, discussing them as the Marine Corps understands them, and considering them in a broader perspective as they apply more generally to Americans whether or not they…

   Marine Corps Principles and Traits of Leadership, Part 2

   Marine Corps Principles and Traits of Leadership, Part 2

Last month, we considered the first principle of leadership recognized by the Marine Corps: Know yourself and seek self-improvement. We considered also the first trait of a leader: Justice. This month, we will examine the second principle, which is to be technically and tactically proficient, and the important trait of judgment.  The Marine Corps’ understanding of technical and tactical proficiency holds…

Principles and Traits of Marine Corps Leadership, Part 3

Principles and Traits of Marine Corps Leadership, Part 3

In an essay titled “On Remembering Who We Are,” the late Melvin Bradford observed the following: “Yet as [Michael] Oakeshott insists, moral conduct is an art, insofar as it concerns the relations of men—an art learned by apprenticeship. And society is the necessary context of that learning.” The point that is made here is meant to…

Principles and Traits of Marine Corps Leadership, Part 4

Principles and Traits of Marine Corps Leadership, Part 4

Last month, we considered the Marine Corps leadership principle of knowing one’s people and looking out for their welfare. The next principle, keep your Marine personnel informed, is an extension of this, and it presents to us the interesting task of defining what is meant by being “informed.” In the discipline of biomedical ethics, the…

Human Acts

Human Acts

In September, we published “On Honor, Courage, and Commitment” as the first essay for the Marine Leadership Forum at Carolina Museum of the Marine. Last month, we followed with “Self-Possession” which is intended to describe this important quality to be developed in people who are able competently to govern themselves and to contribute to the…

Front and Center Newsletter – Vol. 2, No. 10, October 2023

FRONT AND CENTER Vol. 2, No 10, October 2023 Mission Honoring the legacy of Carolina Marines and Sailors, inspiring future generations Message from the CE0 We are aggressively working with the Department of the Navy (owner of the land) to expedite the processing of the site lease. Fortunately, it is no longer a question of “if…

Self-Possession

Self-Possession

In September, we published “On Honor, Courage, and Commitment.” The piece was written in two parts: the first describes the natures of honor, courage, and commitment, identifying them as virtues, and the second discusses the nature of virtue in general, how virtues may be acquired, and how they guide conduct. This is a first step…

Traits & Principles of USMC Leadership

Traits & Principles of USMC Leadership

Leadership is intangible, hard to measure, & difficult to describe. Its quality would seem to stem from many factors. But certainly they must include a measure of inherent ability to control & direct, self-confidence based on expert knowledge, initiative, loyalty, pride, & sense of responsibility. Inherent ability cannot be instilled, but that which is latent or dormant can be developed. Other ingredients can be acquired. They are not easily learned. But leaders can be & are made.

MCDP 1 Warfighting

MCDP 1 Warfighting

Since Fleet Marine Force Manual 1, Warfighting, was first published in 1989, it has had a significant impact both inside and outside the Marine Corps. That manual has changed the way Marines think about warfare. It has caused energetic debate and has been translated into several foreign languages, issued by foreign militaries, and published commercially. It has strongly influenced the development of doctrine by our sister Services.

Grayisms

Grayisms

Grayisms and other thoughts on leadership from General Al Gray, USMC (Retired), 29th Commandant of the Marine Corps. Compiled by PAUL OTTE “I don’t run a democracy. I train troops to defend democracy and I happen to be their surrogate father and mother as well as their commanding general.” Table of Contents From the very…